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1
Baptism of Grace Hardaker, 10 Nov 1697 at Rawdon
Baptism of Grace Hardaker, 10 Nov 1697 at Rawdon
 
 
2
Birth Certificate - Sarah Hardaker - 1882
Birth Certificate - Sarah Hardaker - 1882
 
 
3
Coroner's Report - Thomas Hardaker and Emma Carrick - 1769
Coroner's Report - Thomas Hardaker and Emma Carrick - 1769
Coroner's report regarding the deaths of Thomas Hardaker and Emma Carrick both struck by lightning on 4 Sep 1869 near Farsley. 
 
4
Exemption from Internment
Exemption from Internment
During the early part of WW2 the British government interned "enemy alias" as potential security risks. Having married a German, Agnes was considered German by marriage, but was deemed exempt from internment, presumably because she was born in England. Emil was interned as an enemy alien during WW1, but not during WW2, possible due to the fact that he was very unwell (he died in January 1945). Moreover, he had been brought to England as a small child and had become in all ways but ancestry, a cockney. There is a story that two of his sons turned up at the Police Station or Courthouse in British military Uniforms urging that their parents should not be interned. We believe, however, the he was subject to a movement restriction order, which meant that he had to remain in the East End of London throughout 'the blitz', when many German bombs fell on the area. 
 
5
Map of the Guiseley parish area, mid-late 1700s
Map of the Guiseley parish area, mid-late 1700s
 
 
6
Marriage - Mary Ann Hardaker & Henry Lister - 1868
Marriage - Mary Ann Hardaker & Henry Lister - 1868
 
 
7
Marriage of Martha Hardaker and Joseph Starkey - 1885
Marriage of Martha Hardaker and Joseph Starkey - 1885
 
 
8
Marriage of Richard Hardaker and Betty Overend 1770
Marriage of Richard Hardaker and Betty Overend 1770
Richard described as a "Worstedman". Witnesses were Samuel Overend (probably Betty's brother) and William Hardaker (most likely a brother, or possibly father or uncle) 
 
9
Marriage of Roger Hardaker and Ann Walker 1631
Marriage of Roger Hardaker and Ann Walker 1631
 
 
10
Marriage of Sarah Hardaker and Albert Dixon - 1905
Marriage of Sarah Hardaker and Albert Dixon - 1905
 
 
11
Marriage register signatures for James Hardaker #299
Marriage register signatures for James Hardaker #299
 
 
12
Our Family History - Marriage of Edward Brown and Mary Stansfield 1861
Our Family History - Marriage of Edward Brown and Mary Stansfield 1861
 
 
13
Our Family History - Marriage of John Hardaker and Mary Pullen 1810
Our Family History - Marriage of John Hardaker and Mary Pullen 1810
Note that two of the witnesses are recorded as Samuel Pullen (Mary's father presumably) and Sarah Pulleyn (a relative most likely). The latter spelling is thought to be the more correct version. 
 
14
Our Family History - Marriage of John Lee and Maria Garnet 1809
Our Family History - Marriage of John Lee and Maria Garnet 1809
 
 
15
Our Family History - Marriage of Samuel Hardaker and Rosa Jacobs 1914
Our Family History - Marriage of Samuel Hardaker and Rosa Jacobs 1914
 
 
16
Our Family History - Marriage of Samuel Pullan and Ann Wade 1786
Our Family History - Marriage of Samuel Pullan and Ann Wade 1786
 
 
17
Our Family History - Marriage of Thomas Ball and Jane Meakin 1863
Our Family History - Marriage of Thomas Ball and Jane Meakin 1863
Note that Thomas's fathers name appears to have been recorded as Charles and then overwritten as John. 
 
18
Our Family History - Marriage of Thomas Sutcliffe and Martha Clare 1868
Our Family History - Marriage of Thomas Sutcliffe and Martha Clare 1868
 
 
19
Our Family History - Marriage of William Ball and Annie Sutcliffe 1898
Our Family History - Marriage of William Ball and Annie Sutcliffe 1898
 
 
20
Smith and Maria Raistrick Diamond Anniversary
Smith and Maria Raistrick Diamond Anniversary
Smith and Maria Raistrick Diamond Anniversary. From the Leeds Times, 5th February 1898 
 
21
The Indictment of Roger and Alice - 1656
The Indictment of Roger and Alice - 1656
From: Quarter Session Records, Yorkshire, England, 1637-1914.

We think it says:

Transfer - And that Roger Hardaker late of Rawden in the county of York clothier and Alice wife of the said Roger on the twentieth day of August in the year of our Lord God one thousand six hundred and fifty six with force and duress exeunt [?] Rawden aforesaid in the west riding of the said county.

The possible 'exeunt' is the hardest word to read. If we have it right, it is Latin for 'they leave', here perhaps 'they leave for'. [From Google: Latin exeunt (“they leave”), the third-person plural present active indicative of exeō (“leave”). The actual word looks like 'xeult' to me, which might be a misspelling of exeult??] If I am right, the Court seems to be saying that Roger and Alice who used to live in Rawdon are are forced to leave 'somewhere' at risk of something nasty happening (duress). It cannot be Rawdon that they are obliged to leave as evidently they were no longer there, being 'late of Rawdon'. I conclude that they are being sent back (transferred) to Rawdon. But that is speculative and a Latin scholar might be able to confirm or contradict this interpretation.

Note that, if this is the right interpretation, it worked, for in his will of 1667 Roger describes himself as 'of Rawdon'.

The question arises of where they were if they were not in Rawdon. There is not much to support it but I wonder if they could have been at Tong, where some of the family turned up some years later.

In any event, it was not at all unusual for people who had left their home parish to be sent back. The reason was that, under the Poor Laws of the time, the parish was responsible for poor relief (social welfare, insofar as such a concept existed). So if you were 'not of this parish' and looked as if you might be in want of 'support' owing to lack of income or illness, disability, old age or infirmity, you would be quite likely to be sent back home.