Anthony PULLEINE

Male 1700 - 1759  (59 years)


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Anthony PULLEINE 
    Born 1700  Dunkeswick, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 1759  Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried 13 May 1759  Spofforth Church, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I564  Our Family Tree
    Last Modified 14 May 2016 

    Father Henry PULLEYNE,   b. Abt 1658,   d. Jan 1712, Dunkeswick, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 54 years) 
    Mother (PULLEIN) 
    Family ID F232  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary STEEL,   b. Feb 1711, East Keswick, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1764, East Keswick, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 52 years) 
    Married 19 Jun 1733  Harewood Church, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5
    • By banns.
    Children 
     1. Mary PULLEIN,   b. 1733-1734, Horsehouse Woods, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Mar 1734, Horsehouse Woods, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     2. John PULLEIN,   b. 1735, Horsehouse Woods, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1784, Idle, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years)
     3. Anthony PULLEIN,   b. 1737, Horsehouse Woods, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1739  (Age 2 years)
     4. Mary PULLEIN,   b. 1739, Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. Susannah PULLEIN,   b. 1743, Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. Elizabeth PULLEIN,   b. 1744, Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1763, Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 19 years)
     7. Francis PULLEIN,   b. 1746, Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1803, York Tavern, York, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     8. Henry PULLEIN,   b. 1750, Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     9. Ann PULLEIN,   b. 1752, Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     10. William PULLEIN,   b. 1755, Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 14 May 2016 
    Family ID F178  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1700 - Dunkeswick, Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 19 Jun 1733 - Harewood Church, Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1759 - Addlethorp, Sicklinghall, Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 13 May 1759 - Spofforth Church, Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Histories
    Our Family History - Research on our Pullein Ancestors
    Our Family History - Research on our Pullein Ancestors
    Our link to the Pullein family comes through Mary Pullan, the wife of John Hardaker of Idle. Mary was born in Idle in 1786 and died there in 1854. She and John had ten children, among them Samuel Hardaker, father of John Lee Hardaker.

  • Notes 
    • Anthony was born at Dunkeswick but, after his marriage, lived first at Horsehouse Woods. I have not been able to locate this place and a local old timer whom I asked also had never heard of it. Later Anthony gave his place of residence as Addelthorp. In modern times there is a farm called Addlethorp Grange about 1 km east of the village of Sicklinghall. There is a wood there called Addlethorp Wood which might have been called Horsehouse Wood previously.
      Anthony baptised his children at Spofforth Church since, in those days, there was no church in Sicklinghall. It is not clear why he chose Spofforth since Kirby Overblow is nearer. Perhaps he lived in the parish if Spofforth, which in any case was probably a more substantial settlement than Kirby Overblow.
      Spofforth is an ancient village, mentioned in the Doomsday Book as Spawford or village by the ford. After the Norman Conquest in 1066 the Percy family lived at Spofforth when they were rewarded with the gift of the manor. In fact, they were such favourites with William the Conqueror that he gave them 86 lordships in Yorkshire.
      In those days where the ruined castle stands today there stood a fortified manor house. The castle itself dates from the 13th century, with many additions in the 14th and 15th centuries. In 1309 Henry de Percy bought the manor of Alnwick in Northumberland and the family moved there, taking the title of Earls and later Dukes of Northumberland. The castle was last lived in 1604.
      During the Civil War in the 1640s, many of the castles of the aristocracy were destroyed by Oliver Cromwell and his supporters. Spofforth Castle was among them, and rather little now remains, in part because much of the castle stone was used to build surrounding houses. There would be even less left but for the fact that part of the main hall and undercroft were carved from the native sandstone rather than being built of quarried and dressed stones.
      Spofforth church, where Anthony baptised his children, is not the one to be seen today. This was rebuilt in the late 19th century in Norman style to look old and to match the 15th century tower.
      A quick search of the churchyard failed to locate any Pullan graves, but we did find the grave of Blind Jack of Knaresborough - John Metcalf, who became famous in the 18th century as a road builder, despite the fact that he lost his sight as a child. He died at Spofforth in 1810 at the grand old age of 92. His epitaph, which can still be read with some difficulty, reads as follows:
      Here lies John Metcalf, one whose infant sight
      Felt the dark pressure of an endless night;
      Yet such the fervour of his dauntless mind,
      His limbs full strength, his spirit unfonfin'd,
      That long ere yet life's bolder years began,
      His sightless efforts mark'd th' aspiring man,
      Nor mark'd in vain - high deeds his manhood dar'd,
      And commerce, travel, both his ardour shar'd,
      'Twas his, a guide's unerring aid to lend;
      O'er trackless wastes to bid new roads extend;
      And when Rebellion rear'd her giant size,
      'Twas his to burn with patriot enterprise -
      For parting wife and babes one pang to feel,
      The welcome danger for his country's weal.

      Reader! like him, exert thy utmost talent given;
      Reader! like him, adore the bounteous Hand of Heaven!

      He died on the 26th day of April 1840 (or 1810?) in the 93rd year of his age

      Sicklinghall goes back to before Doomsday when it was know as Sidingal. In a chronicle written in 1284 it was called Siclinghalle. In 1284 the manor was in the hands of William the Conqueror, who gave it to his friend Robert de Romille, a mighty baron who also was given Harewood and Skipton. It is thought that Rombolds Moor at Ilkley was named after him. Sicklinghall later passed to the equally powerful Vavasours of Hazelwood Castle, near Tadcaster, who also had property at Weston, Otley, where other members of the Pullan family lived.
      Not far from Addlethorpe Grange lies Kearby, another ancient settlement predating the Doomsday Book and having links with the Norse invaders. Kearby's link to the Pullan family relates to a supposed witch, Jenny Pullan, who lived in the neighbourhood at the turn of the eighteenth century. It was said that she was rarely seen in daylight and that lights burned in her cottage late into the night. The locals believed that she used to cross the Wharfe in a sieve. In 1845, buried deep in the garden of a cottage in Kearby a curious yellow stone bottle was dug up. It was filled with objects used in witchcraft such as pins and needles, human hair, brimstone and clippings of fingernails. It was immediately assumed that Jenny Pullan was the one who placed it where it was found.
      As far as I can tell, we are in no way related to Jenny who, in any case, probably never had children.

  • Sources 
    1. [S376] PR transcript Wetherby Library (TS), PR transcript Wetherby Library (TS).

    2. [S378] Spofforth Parish Register (Typescript in 7 volumes), Garside, T, (1989, Typescript in Wetherby Public Library.).

    3. [S193] Catharine Pullein and IGI Film 455121, batch A455121.

    4. [S418] WFHG CD of Register, WFHG CD of Register.

    5. [S429] Ancestry.com CD Yorkshire (WR), Ancestry.com CD Yorkshire (WR).