Richard HARDAKER

Male Abt 1742 - Yes, date unknown


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  • Name Richard HARDAKER 
    Born Abt 1742 
    Gender Male 
    Died Yes, date unknown 
    Person ID I727  Our Family Tree
    Last Modified 22 May 2016 

    Family Betty OVEREND,   b. 1743, Calverley, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 17 Jan 1770  Calverley, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
     1. Samuel HARDAKER,   b. 16 Feb 1771, Rawdon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Mar 1861, Wrose, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
     2. Richard HARDAKER,   b. 2 Oct 1772, Rawdon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Mar 1861  (Age 88 years)
     3. Timothy HARDAKER,   b. 12 May 1775, Rawdon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1832  (Age 56 years)
     4. John HARDAKER,   b. 19 Apr 1780, Rawdon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jun 1870, Idle, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
    Last Modified 14 May 2016 
    Family ID F227  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 17 Jan 1770 - Calverley, Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Documents
    Marriage of Richard Hardaker and Betty Overend 1770
    Marriage of Richard Hardaker and Betty Overend 1770
    Richard described as a "Worstedman". Witnesses were Samuel Overend (probably Betty's brother) and William Hardaker (most likely a brother, or possibly father or uncle)

    Histories
    Our Family History - Research on the Ancestry of Richard Hardaker born c. 1740 at Rawden, Yorkshire
    Our Family History - Research on the Ancestry of Richard Hardaker born c. 1740 at Rawden, Yorkshire
    Richard Hardaker who married Betty Overend at Calverley church on 17 January 1770 is the earliest direct Hardaker ancestor I have been able to find. This document outlines the main lines of enquiry investigated to date in an attempt to determine his ancestry.
    Link to: Baptist Beginnings in the West Riding (Buckstone Baptist Chapel)
    Link to: Baptist Beginnings in the West Riding (Buckstone Baptist Chapel)
    Richard Hardaker (#727; #270), recorded the births of his four sons at Buckstone Baptist Chapel. The congregation was believed to have evolved from the group of Puritans who worshiped in secret under the lee of Buckstone Rock, Rawdon, among whom John Hardaker (#7), son of Roger who died in 1667, was a leading light.
    Research on Richard Hardaker of Rawdon - A 30 Year Old Puzzle Solved
    Research on Richard Hardaker of Rawdon - A 30 Year Old Puzzle Solved
    This paper presents a new theory that we think finally Solves the long standing problem of the ancestry of Richard Hardaker who married Betty Overend in 1770.

  • Notes 
    • It is strange that we know so little about him - no birth or death. He may have been the R. Hardaker who was a subscriber to the Idle Upper Chapel Sunday School in 1808 (ECH's notes), but that person could also have been his son Richard.

      At his marriage he was described as a 'Worstedman of Guiseley' - presumably of Guiseley parish. A witness at his marriage was a William Hardaker, possibly his father but more likely a brother.

      An occupation in worsted production was a little unusual at that time. I found only a dozen or so men described as in the worsted industry in the Calverley marriage records of the period 1761-1780. Richard must have learned the trade as an apprentice. It is possible that he was the Richard Hardaker apprenticed in 1766 to a Joshua Armitage of Clayton, near Bradford, Joshua being a 'stuff maker' (Apprenticeship records in Ancestry.com). According to Elvira Willmott, 1989, Occupations in Eighteenth Century Bradford, I believe that a stuffmaker was a weaver of a coarse worsted cloth. The record tells us nothing useful about this Richard. However, I think it is unlikely that this was 'our' Richard. Apprenticeships typically lasted for several years and apprentices were forbidden to marry.

      Worsted is cloth made from long fibres of sheep's wool. The longer fibres, called tops, are combed to make the worsted thread. The cloth was named after the village of Worsted in Norfolk. Production in Britain was dominated for 400 years by East Anglia, based on skills acquired from Flemish settlers who arrived there in 1331. By 1770 production of worsted cloth in the West Riding had equalled that from East Anglia. Production took place around Leeds, Bradford, Halifax, Huddersfield and Wakefield.

      Same person in "Hardaker One-name Study" tree: http://hardakerfamily.id.au/getperson.php?personID=I270&tree=tree3

  • Sources 
    1. [S203] IGI M007253.